Posted by: lianadevine | 5 October 2007

An Experiment on a Rainy Day

I’ve seen so many rainy days in the past week, that I’ve almost run out of things to do – plus I’m bus-bound with a cold. So for fun, today, I’m trying an experiment: to see if I can get a post translated into Spanish, automatically. I’ve been looking into how to do this for a couple of days, and it seems it might be possible, just not so accurate. However, it’s probably better than waiting for me to write an entire post in Spanish. And I’d like for our Mexican friends to be able to read our updates. Let’s give it a go…..!

It’s now a day later, and after MUCH experimentation and some wonderful helping hands in the WordPress Forum, I have a clickable link in the sidebar that automatically translates this blog. Look at the top right, where it says “AUTOTRANSLATION” and click on the red type that says (in Spanish, obviously) Click here for Spanish, and you’ll see what I mean.  Cool, eh?

The translation is via Google Translate, and while it’s not 100% accurate to my way of thinking, it’ll be close enough for Spanish-speakers to get the gist of it.  As for the Forum here at WordPress, I can’t say enough about how handy it has been to help this newbie tackle some of the techie bits that make this blog more interesting. I just search the problem, read through the previous posts on the subject, and if that doesn’t resolve it for me, I write in my specific problem and “somebody” in cyberspace (obviously a WordPress member too) gives me an answer.

This feels somewhat like my WebHeads community of practice, who are worldwide – so someone is available 24/7, and knowledgeable – so someone will know how to solve my problem, and happy to share their expertise. So we all learn from each other.

Looks like there’s blue sky out there…in more ways than one!

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Responses

  1. Hello folks! Well, despite the hiccup in your plans it seems that as ever you are making the most of things!… and certainly using the time to make the blog ever more interesting! love the photos.

    do keep sending the link as a reminder by email from time to time.. Its a good nudge to check what you are up to.

    SOOOO impressed by the way you’ve been taking on the new technology and using the web community to learn how to do things!.. you guys are AWESOME!!

    abrazos
    Dawn

  2. Good to hear that you are making the best of it. Nice that you got stuck close to fabric/quilt stores. Marlene convinced me to join the guild. I had lots of fun at the first meeting. It would have been that much better if you had been there.
    I am happy for you two though. It is like opening a cage and letting a bird fly free. Many of us here only dream of what you are doing. (Even if the tranny breaks down!) Rob was really impressed by your adventure and having only a year left before retirement, he started dreaming…. ” But I don’t want to move to Saskatchewan even if it means early retirement!
    Love ya Donna

  3. Slime – how goes the tranny repair ? If you find anything in this part of the world & need someone to go look , don’t phone me !! Just kidding . Lizzy says if you learned to drive properly the tranny wouldn’t have quit ! Let me know if you need anything .
    TTFN .

  4. Hi, Leanne and Calvin.

    I enjoyed reading the latest post, and I agree with those who’ve already added comments that you are making the best of your stay in Vancouver, WA. Keep that blue-sky attitude!

    The rain reminds me of my days in Oregon, particularly on the coast (between Seaside and Tillamook, near Cannon Beach). One interesting memory is of the first day of my move from Portland to Phoenix: constant rain all the way into California, but lots of sun (and a temperature of 120º, as I remember) when I arrived in Phoenix the next day. I didn’t mind the rain at all when I lived in Oregon; I actually miss it, as a matter of fact, here in Phoenix.

    I think you have the right perspective, Leanne, on automatic translation: it’s not (as far as I can tell) 100% accurate, but it’s close enough to communicate the gist of what you want to say. One challenge is the fact that, like English, Spanish often has several different translations for a particular word or phrase, and these different translations often have completely different meanings (or are for different parts of speech); the autotranslations, though, often don’t give the right one. One good thing, however, is that the autotranslations do put in accent marks and diacritics (like the eñe), and they seem to do a fairly good job of matching the genders of head nouns with pronouns and adjectives that refer to those nouns.

    I also use Google TranslateBabelfish, and an online English-Spanish dictionary at http://www.freedict.com/onldict/spa.html . By translating and then re-translating, I can usually be reasonably sure that I’ve communicated more or less understandably. Idioms in either English or Spanish are, of course, the hardest to manage.

    Well, enough for now. I’m already looking forward to the next installment of your saga.

    Take care of that cold, Leanne!

    Cariñosamente,

    Dennis in Phoenix

  5. I love the translation widget. Awesome! Time for bed…


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